There are a few questions to ask yourself in order to know how to answer this question correctly.  First of all, are you selling a mobile home and land together or will you be selling just the home only?  What is the year, make, model, size and condition of the home? If the home has to be relocated, how much do the local installers charge for the complete job? Will this be a trade in to a dealer in exchange for a newer house? These are the most common questions that will help you find the value of a home.

Ok so the first question was is there going to be land involved with the sale of the home or not.  If the land and the home will be sold together as one then your best bet is to hire an appraiser or ask a local realtor to do what they call a "drive by" appraisal.  The realtor may charge a small fee of few hundred dollars but it'll give you an idea of what your home is worth on the current market that your home is in.  If you want an exact figure then you will have to hire an appraiser because unless you are selling it to a cash buyer, any lender will require that an appraisal be done prior to them loaning the money.  The only problem with getting an appraisal though is that they are only good for so long, so if it takes a long time to sell your home, the customer may still have to have another appraisal done to satisfy the lender.  That, however, is an expense of the buyer so you wouldn't have to pay for the second one.  If you are selling the "home only" then the best way to get an estimated value is from an NADA guide.  You may be able to call a local Manufactured Home dealer and have them get that value for you for free.  If none are available or not willing to do that for you then you can go to www.nada.com and get the value from the NADA guide.   They charge around $20 for that one time service.  It will give you the full top retail value of the home.  Most banks will accept those as a guideline for a value of the home when someone is trying to get a loan.

The second question ties directly to the previous question.  The reason being is that in order to get an accurate NADA value, you have to know the year, make, model, size and condition of the home.  Believe it or not, the make and model make a huge difference in value.  Some brands will have an extremely high book value where others will be the exact opposite.  Usually because the value is a direct reflection of what options were used in the home when it was built and how well the home was constructed.  Some brand names also are just more "well known" so when you go to sell them, it may influence the customer into buying the home simply because they know of the quality attributed to that particular manufacturer, making it have a little higher value.  

After you have determined the value of a "home only" that has to be moved, the next step is to figure out how much it'll cost for the home to be relocated.  Potential buyers will consider this as part of the overall purchase price since they will inevitably have to bare that expense.  Therefore, when pricing a home for sale, you will more than likely have to deduct from the overall NADA value the cost of relocating the home to another piece of land and setting it back up.  Banks will generally never loan more than the overall NADA price and most potential buyers wont have the money to pay for relocating the home out of their pocket, therefore you'll have to figure that into your overall value/asking price so that they can wrap it up into their loan.

The last question pertains to trade-ins.  You can pretty well throw the NADA value out of the window when trade-ins are concerned.  This is because any dealer that is taking a trade in will have to get the home at a significantly lower price in order to be able to bring the home to their lot, refurbish it, sell it and move it for under the NADA retail value.  If any dealer is offering you a ridiculously high price compare to other dealers then odds are you are paying way too much for the home that you are buying from them!  That is just an indicator that they have a huge amount packed into their price to allow for trade-ins.  Your best bet is to find a good independent dealer who offers you the lowest price available on the home that you are trying to buy and then have them give you the real trade in value.  You will always make less on a trade-in though than you will if you sell the home outright... no matter who you are trading it in to.  Sometime when you trade something in, you will come out on the wrong end of deal.  Think about it like this, if they have money packed into their price then you are actually financing a larger amount of money.  This means that you are paying them more for the home that you are trying to buy just to take your trade in...that's never a good idea!  That's sort of like buying your trade in again! Yikes!

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AuthorWeston Chapman

There are a lot of people that believe that manufactured homes/mobile homes are built cheaper by cutting corners.  This, however, is simply not true.  This video will help elaborate further on the true benefits/values in owning a manufactured, mobile or modular home.

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AuthorWeston Chapman

Many people ask the question,  "Are mobile homes/manufactured homes safe to live in?"  The answer is Yes.  In fact, most of the time, they are safer than a lot of traditional site built homes. Watch this video for a more thorough explanation.

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AuthorWeston Chapman

Mobile homes containing formaldehyde is still a big concern to a lot of consumers.  Just how bad is it?  Not as bad as most people think.  In fact, formaldehyde is in the very home that you are living in right now!  Read this blog to learn the answers to some of the commonly asked questions about Formaldehyde and also learn more about your possible exposures.

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AuthorWeston Chapman

There are quite a few companies that offer insurance for mobile homes, manufactured homes and modular homes in Oklahoma and Texas.  For some reason, a lot of the more well known independent insurance carriers that you see on TV will not insure mobile homes, but fortunately there are a lot of good companies out there that will.  Here is a list of some of the more popular companies that either specialize in mobile and manufactured home insurance or have really good rates.  These are not in any specific order:  American Bankers of Florida (Assurant), American Modern, American Summit, Foremost (Owned by Farmers), North Star, FarmAssure (MDOW), Markel, Lloyd's of London, Aegis, National Fire and Security, Standard Casualty Company and more!  

A good insurance agent with access to a lot of these companies and that is familiar with mobile homes (this is the key) will know which company is best to run you with.  Factors such as location of the home, distance from the fire department, rating of the fire department, distance to a fire hydrant, type of policy, past claims and even credit scores can all affect the premium.  I have seen policies that are literally half the price of others with the same amount of coverage and the only difference is the company that it is written with.  It is always a good idea to check around every few years just to make sure that you are not just throwing away extra money that could be used to pay something off instead of just giving it away to the insurance company!

Want to know if you are paying too much?  Visit http://www.texomainsurancegroup.com and get a quick quote from an agency that SPECIALIZES in mobile homes, manufactured home and modular home insurance.  They can write mobile home insurance in all 50 states. 

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AuthorWeston Chapman

This is a question asked by many!  There are several different ways to "OWN" a park and make money, but I will focus only on one... The way that makes the most money with the least amount of time and investment!  If you have considered starting a mobile home park or doing rentals then you need to read this.

Posted
AuthorWeston Chapman